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October 2008

From the Director of Women's Health Primary Care

Dr. Anne Chang, medical director of UCSF Women's Health Primary Care, addresses the importance of patient screening for diseases such as familial cancer and for situations that impact patient health such as domestic violence.

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New Migraine Treatments Reduce Pain, Headache Frequency

New treatments for migraine headaches are providing major advantages over older therapies — reducing pain in more people for longer periods and reducing the frequency of headaches.

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Research Examines Patient Satisfaction, Outcomes of LASIK

LASIK, considered one of the most successful and safe elective procedures, is undergoing renewed scrutiny by the Food and Drug Administration with respect to patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes. A recent UCSF study addressed the causes and prevention of patient dissatisfaction.

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Should Young Athletes Have Heart Disease Screening?

High profile athletes, such as Reggie Lewis and Hank Gathers, have died from sudden cardiac death, raising awareness of the condition in all athletes. Should all young athletes have an electrocardiogram (ECG) to screen for heart conditions before playing sports?

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Lung Transplant Evaluations Important for Emphysema Patients

Many doctors are reluctant to refer emphysema patients for a lung transplant, even though they have excellent survival rates after the procedure, the only cure for the disease.

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Genetic Testing Key to Detecting Lynch Syndrome

Genetic screening detects an estimated 95 percent of individuals with Lynch syndrome, a condition that leads to higher risk for colorectal, ovarian and endometrial cancer. The vast majority of Lynch syndrome gene carriers, however, go undetected.

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Early Testing Crucial to Hepatitis B Treatment

A simple blood test can detect hepatitis B (HBV) in patients before they develop any symptoms of the disease, which can be treated with medications that suppress, slow or reverse associated liver disease. If HBV progresses to liver failure, liver transplants are an option.

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Continuing Medical Education

Attend one of UCSF's upcoming CME courses for the latest research in medicine. See a list of courses by department.

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