Clifford Lowell

MD PhD

Chair of Laboratory Medicine
Laboratory medicine specialist
Immunology researcher and struggling golf addict

Dr. Clifford Lowell is a specialist in laboratory-based diagnostic analysis. He performs all tests on blood and body fluids, such as bone marrow or spinal fluid samples. He serves as chair of UCSF's laboratory medicine department.

Lowell's research group focuses on immune cell dysfunction in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. He uses mouse models of these disease processes to understand how faulty regulation of immune cell function leads to disease development. Correcting these abnormalities offers new approaches to treating immune-based disorders.

Lowell earned his medical degree from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, where he also completed a doctorate in biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology. He completed a residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in immunology at Johns Hopkins as well.

Lowell is a member of the Association of Medical Laboratory Immunologists, Society for Leukocyte Biology and American Association of Immunologists. He has served on many national and international review panels for publications, grants and symposia in the field of immunology. With a passion for teaching, he finds great personal reward in seeing new faculty members become successful physician-scientists.

In his free time, Lowell enjoys golfing. A member of the Olympic Club in San Francisco, he plays as often as he can, although he is dismayed to note that, like his age, his golf scores seem to be constantly going up.

  • Education

    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, PhD, Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology, 1986

    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 1986

  • Residencies

    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Internal Medicine, 1989

  • Fellowships

    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Immunology, 1995

  • Academic Title

    Professor

  • Languages

    Spanish

Medical care is becoming a data-driven profession, and laboratory medicine is all about expanding patient data to improve patient outcomes.

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