University of California San Francisco | About UCSF | UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital San Francisco
Search Site | Find a Doctor

Vasanth Vedantham, M.D., Ph.D.

Cardiologist and electrophysiologist

Dr. Vasanth Vedantham specializes in treating heart rhythm disorders using catheter ablation, pacemaker and defibrillator implantation and antiarrhythmic medications. Conditions he treats include supraventricular tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, ventricular tachycardia, bradycardia and syncope. He also implants biventricular devices for cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with heart failure.

Vedantham earned a medical degree and doctorate at Harvard Medical School. He completed an internal medicine residency at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, followed by fellowships in cardiovascular medicine and clinical cardiac electrophysiology at UCSF. His research focuses on the molecular biology of the electrical system of the heart, with a goal to make advances in basic cardiovascular science that will lead to improvements in the treatment and prevention of arrhythmias.

Clinics

Cardiac Electrophysiology and Arrhythmia Service
400 Parnassus Ave., Floor B1, Room 094
San Francisco, CA 94143
Phone: (415) 353-2554
Fax: (415) 353-2528

Hours: Monday to Friday
8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

More about Vasanth Vedantham

Additional Languages

Spanish

Education

Harvard School of Medicine 2002

Residencies

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Internal Medicine 2004

Fellowships

UCSF Medical Center, Cardiac Electrophysiology
UCSF Medical Center, Cardiology 2008

Selected Research and Publications

  1. Stepanyan G, Badhwar N, Lee RJ, Marcus GM, Lee BK, Tseng ZH, Vedantham V, Olgin J, Scheinman M, Gerstenfeld EP. Safety of new oral anticoagulants for patients undergoing atrial fibrillation ablation. J Interv Card Electrophysiol. 2014 Jun; 40(1):33-8.
  2. Kawamura M, Vedantham V, Dewland TA, Scheinman MM. Incessant long RP tachycardia: What is the mechanism? Heart Rhythm. 2014 May; 11(5):904-6.
  3. Hsu JC, Badhwar N, Gerstenfeld EP, Lee RJ, Mandyam MC, Dewland TA, Imburgia KE, Hoffmayer KS, Vedantham V, Lee BK, Tseng ZH, Scheinman MM, Olgin JE, Marcus GM. Randomized trial of conventional transseptal needle versus radiofrequency energy needle puncture for left atrial access (the TRAVERSE-LA study). J Am Heart Assoc. 2013 Oct; 2(5):e000428.
  4. Vedantham V, Jackman WM, Scheinman MM. Unexpected potential following ablation of a right atriofascicular accessory pathway. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2013 Aug; 24(8):939-41.
  5. Vedantham V, Evangelista M, Huang Y, Srivastava D. Spatiotemporal regulation of an Hcn4 enhancer defines a role for Mef2c and HDACs in cardiac electrical patterning. Dev Biol. 2013 Jan 1; 373(1):149-62.
  6. Scheinman MM, Vedantham V. Ivabradine: a ray of hope for inappropriate sinus tachycardia. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Oct 9; 60(15):1330-2.
  7. Qian L, Huang Y, Spencer CI, Foley A, Vedantham V, Liu L, Conway SJ, Fu JD, Srivastava D. In vivo reprogramming of murine cardiac fibroblasts into induced cardiomyocytes. Nature. 2012 May 31; 485(7400):593-8.
  8. Mandyam MC, Vedantham V, Scheinman MM, Tseng ZH, Badhwar N, Lee BK, Lee RJ, Gerstenfeld EP, Olgin JE, Marcus GM. Alcohol and vagal tone as triggers for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Am J Cardiol. 2012 Aug 1; 110(3):364-8.
  9. Hsu JC, Badhwar N, Lee BK, Vedantham V, Tseng ZH, Marcus GM. Predictors of fluoroscopy time and procedural failure during biventricular device implantation. Am J Cardiol. 2012 Jul 15; 110(2):240-5.
  10. Ieda M, Fu JD, Delgado-Olguin P, Vedantham V, Hayashi Y, Bruneau BG, Srivastava D. Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes by defined factors. Cell. 2010 Aug 6; 142(3):375-86.
  11. Zhao Y, Ransom JF, Li A, Vedantham V, von Drehle M, Muth AN, Tsuchihashi T, McManus MT, Schwartz RJ, Srivastava D. Dysregulation of cardiogenesis, cardiac conduction, and cell cycle in mice lacking miRNA-1-2. Cell. 2007 Apr 20; 129(2):303-17.
  12. Vedantham V, Cannon SC. Rapid and slow voltage-dependent conformational changes in segment IVS6 of voltage-gated Na(+) channels. Biophys J. 2000 Jun; 78(6):2943-58.
  13. Vedantham V, Cannon SC. The position of the fast-inactivation gate during lidocaine block of voltage-gated Na+ channels. J Gen Physiol. 1999 Jan; 113(1):7-16.
  14. Vedantham V, Cannon SC. Slow inactivation does not affect movement of the fast inactivation gate in voltage-gated Na+ channels. J Gen Physiol. 1998 Jan; 111(1):83-93.

Publications are derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and provided by UCSF Profiles, a service of the Clinical & Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at UCSF. Researchers can make corrections and additions to their publications by logging on to UCSF Profiles.