Overview

Sarcoidosis

Sarcoidosis is a disorder that causes inflamed tissue, called nodules or granulomas, to develop in the body's organs, most often the lungs. It can also affect the skin, eyes, nose, muscles, heart, liver, spleen, bowel, kidney, testes, nerves, lymph nodes and brain. Nodules in the lungs can lead to narrowing of the airways and inflammation, also called fibrosis, of lung tissue.

Sarcoidosis affects people of all ages, races and gender, though it most commonly occurs in people between 20 to 40 years old. Children are rarely diagnosed with the disease. In very few cases, more than one family member is affected. African-Americans are three to four times more likely to have sarcoidosis and may have a more severe form of the disease than people of European descent.

Our Approach to Sarcoidosis

Many cases of sarcoidosis resolve on their own and cause no lasting problems. If the condition persists, UCSF offers specialized care that includes medications to relieve symptoms and decrease inflammation. Our specialists review each case as a team to ensure that every patient gets the right diagnosis and most effective care.

Awards & recognition

  • usnews-neurology

    Best hospital in Northern California

  • usnews-pulmonology

    Best in Northern California for pulmonology and lung surgery

  • n7-2x

    Ranked No. 8 in the nation for pulmonology and lung surgery

UCSF Health medical specialists have reviewed this information. It is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor or other health care provider. We encourage you to discuss any questions or concerns you may have with your provider.

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