Emily Finlayson, MD, MS

Colorectal surgeon

Dr. Emily Finlayson is a colorectal surgeon with expertise in the treatment of colon and rectal cancer, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. She also is a specialist in minimally invasive surgical techniques.

Finlayson earned a medical degree at Harvard Medical School in Cambridge, Mass. She trained in general surgery at UCSF and in colon and rectal surgery at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. In her postdoctorate training, she earned a master of science degree at the Center for Evaluative Clinical Sciences at Dartmouth Medical School and completed a research fellowship with the VA Outcomes Group in White River Junction, Vt.. She was on faculty of the University of Michigan Department of Surgery and the Michigan Surgical Collaborative for Outcomes Research and Evaluation until she returned to UCSF in 2009. Her research addresses population-based surgical outcomes with a focus on functional outcomes in the frail elderly.

Clinics

Center for Colorectal Surgery
1825 Fourth St., Fourth Floor
San Francisco, CA 94158
Phone: (415) 885-3606
Fax: (415) 885-7678

Hours: Monday to Friday
8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Conditions & Treatments

Board Certification

Colon & Rectal Surgery, American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery
Surgery, American Board of Surgery

Academic Title

Professor

More about Emily Finlayson

Education

Harvard School of Medicine 1997

Residencies

UCSF Medical Center, Surgery 2002
UCSF Medical Center, Surgery 2004
Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Surgery 2005

Fellowships

Mayo Clinic, Colon & Rectal Surgery 2007

Selected Research and Publications

  1. Suskind AM, Zhao S, Walter LC, Boscardin WJ, Finlayson E. Mortality and Functional Outcomes After Minor Urological Surgery in Nursing Home Residents: A National Study. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2018 Mar 23.
  2. Berian JR, Baker TL, Rosenthal RA, Coleman J, Finlayson E, Katlic MR, Lagoo-Deenadayalan SA, Tang VL, Robinson TN, Ko CY, Russell MM. Application of the RAND-UCLA Appropriateness Methodology to a Large Multidisciplinary Stakeholder Group Evaluating the Validity and Feasibility of Patient-Centered Standards in Geriatric Surgery. Health Serv Res. 2018 Mar 22.
  3. Seib CD, Rochefort H, Chomsky-Higgins K, Gosnell JE, Suh I, Shen WT, Duh QY, Finlayson E. Association of Patient Frailty With Increased Morbidity After Common Ambulatory General Surgery Operations. JAMA Surg. 2018 Feb 01; 153(2):160-168.
  4. Berian JR, Rosenthal RA, Baker TL, Coleman J, Finlayson E, Katlic MR, Lagoo-Deenadayalan SA, Tang VL, Robinson TN, Ko CY, Russell MM. Hospital Standards to Promote Optimal Surgical Care of the Older Adult: A Report From the Coalition for Quality in Geriatric Surgery. Ann Surg. 2018 Feb; 267(2):280-290.
  5. Fleming F, Gaertner W, Ternent CA, Finlayson E, Herzig D, Paquette IM, Feingold DL, Steele SR. The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Clinical Practice Guideline for the Prevention of Venous Thromboembolic Disease in Colorectal Surgery. Dis Colon Rectum. 2018 Jan; 61(1):14-20.
  6. Colley A, Finlayson E. Treatment Intensity After Traumatic Brain Injury: More Is Not Better. JAMA Surg. 2018 Jan 01; 153(1):51.
  7. Min L, Hall K, Finlayson E, Englesbe M, Palazzolo W, Chan CL, Hou H, Miller A, Diehl KM. Estimating Risk of Postsurgical General and Geriatric Complications Using the VESPA Preoperative Tool. JAMA Surg. 2017 Dec 01; 152(12):1126-1133.
  8. Berian JR, Zhou L, Hornor MA, Russell MM, Cohen ME, Finlayson E, Ko CY, Robinson TN, Rosenthal RA. Optimizing Surgical Quality Datasets to Care for Older Adults: Lessons from the American College of Surgeons NSQIP Geriatric Surgery Pilot. J Am Coll Surg. 2017 Dec; 225(6):702-712.e1.
  9. Taylor LJ, Rathouz PJ, Berlin A, Brasel KJ, Mosenthal AC, Finlayson E, Cooper Z, Steffens NM, Jacobson N, Buffington A, Tucholka JL, Zhao Q, Schwarze ML. Navigating high-risk surgery: protocol for a multisite, stepped wedge, cluster-randomised trial of a question prompt list intervention to empower older adults to ask questions that inform treatment decisions. BMJ Open. 2017 May 29; 7(5):e014002.
  10. Suskind AM, Quanstrom K, Zhao S, Bridge M, Walter LC, Neuhaus J, Finlayson E. Overactive Bladder Is Strongly Associated With Frailty in Older Individuals. Urology. 2017 Aug; 106:26-31.
  11. Pangilinan J, Quanstrom K, Bridge M, Walter LC, Finlayson E, Suskind AM. The Timed Up and Go Test as a Measure of Frailty in Urologic Practice. Urology. 2017 Aug; 106:32-38.
  12. Suskind AM, Finlayson E. A Call for Frailty Screening in the Preoperative Setting. JAMA Surg. 2017 Mar 01; 152(3):240-241.
  13. Suskind AM, Jin C, Walter LC, Finlayson E. Frailty and the Role of Obliterative versus Reconstructive Surgery for Pelvic Organ Prolapse: A National Study. J Urol. 2017 Jun; 197(6):1502-1506.
  14. Suskind AM, Walter LC, Zhao S, Finlayson E. Functional Outcomes After Transurethral Resection of the Prostate in Nursing Home Residents. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2017 Apr; 65(4):699-703.
  15. Kaplan JA, Brinson Z, Hofer R, O'Sullivan P, Chang A, Horvath H, Chang GJ, Finlayson E. Early learners as health coaches for older adults preparing for surgery. J Surg Res. 2017 Mar; 209:184-190.
  16. Velayos F, Kathpalia P, Finlayson E. Changing Paradigms in Detection of Dysplasia and Management of Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Is Colectomy Still Necessary? Gastroenterology. 2017 Feb; 152(2):440-450.e1.
  17. Yeo H, Mao J, Abelson JS, Lachs M, Finlayson E, Milsom J, Sedrakyan A. Development of a Nonparametric Predictive Model for Readmission Risk in Elderly Adults After Colon and Rectal Cancer Surgery. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Nov; 64(11):e125-e130.
  18. Suskind AM, Finlayson E. Focus on Surgical Outcomes That Matter to Older Patients. JAMA Surg. 2016 09 21; 151(9):e161701.
  19. Tang VL, Sudore R, Cenzer IS, Boscardin WJ, Smith A, Ritchie C, Wallhagen M, Finlayson E, Petrillo L, Covinsky K. Rates of Recovery to Pre-Fracture Function in Older Persons with Hip Fracture: an Observational Study. J Gen Intern Med. 2017 Feb; 32(2):153-158.
  20. Suskind AM, Finlayson E, Walter LC. Author Reply. Urology. 2016 11; 97:32.

Publications are derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and provided by UCSF Profiles, a service of the Clinical & Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at UCSF. Researchers can make corrections and additions to their publications by logging on to UCSF Profiles.