Jonathan Carter, MD

Bariatric and general surgeon

Dr. Jonathan Carter is a surgeon who specializes in minimally invasive advanced laparoscopic and robotic surgery to treat abdominal conditions, including hernias and disorders of the esophagus, gallbladder, stomach and intestines. He is also a bariatric surgeon and a member of the acute care surgery program, which provides surgical care in emergency situations.

After earning his medical degree at Stanford University, Carter completed a residency in surgery and a fellowship in advanced laparoscopic and bariatric surgery at UCSF. He received the Julius R. Krevans Award for patient care at UCSF as well as the prestigious Fred H. and Esther E. Nusz Achievement Award.

Carter is an associate professor of surgery at UCSF and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. As a faculty member, Carter has authored more than 60 peer-reviewed research papers in the areas of esophageal disease, bariatric surgery, hernia and medical informatics.

Carter received the Haile T. Debas Academy of Medical Educator's Excellence in Teaching Award in 2008, UCSF Academy of Medical Educators Excellence in Teaching Award in 2015 and UCSF Patient Safety Award in 2014 and 2016.

Clinics

Bariatric Surgery Center
400 Parnassus Ave., Sixth Floor, Reception Desk 6S
San Francisco, CA 94143-0338
Phone (existing patients):
(415) 353-2161
Phone (new patients):
(415) 353-2804
Fax: (415) 353-2505

Hours: Monday to Friday
8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Gastrointestinal Surgery at Parnassus
400 Parnassus Ave., Sixth Floor
San Francisco, CA 94143-0388
Phone: (415) 353-2161
Fax: (415) 353-2505

Hours: Monday to Friday
8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Conditions & Treatments

Board Certification

Surgery, American Board of Surgery

Academic Title

Associate Professor

More about Jonathan Carter

Education

Stanford University School of Medicine 2000

Residencies

UCSF Medical Center, General Surgery 2008

Fellowships

UCSF Medical Center, Advanced GI Minimally Invasive/Bariatric Surgery 2009

Selected Research and Publications

  1. Kumar SB, Hamilton BC, Wood SG, Rogers SJ, Carter JT, Lin MY. Is laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy safer than laparoscopic gastric bypass? a comparison of 30-day complications using the MBSAQIP data registry. Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2018 Mar; 14(3):264-269.
  2. Schafer AL, Kazakia GJ, Vittinghoff E, Stewart L, Rogers SJ, Kim TY, Carter JT, Posselt AM, Pasco C, Shoback DM, Black DM. Effects of Gastric Bypass Surgery on Bone Mass and Microarchitecture Occur Early and Particularly Impact Postmenopausal Women. J Bone Miner Res. 2017 Dec 27.
  3. Kim TY, Schwartz AV, Li X, Xu K, Black DM, Petrenko DM, Stewart L, Rogers SJ, Posselt AM, Carter JT, Shoback DM, Schafer AL. Bone Marrow Fat Changes After Gastric Bypass Surgery Are Associated With Loss of Bone Mass. J Bone Miner Res. 2017 Nov; 32(11):2239-2247.

Publications are derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and provided by UCSF Profiles, a service of the Clinical & Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at UCSF. Researchers can make corrections and additions to their publications by logging on to UCSF Profiles.