Matthew Lin, MD

Gastrointestinal surgeon

Dr. Matthew Y.C. Lin is a gastrointestinal surgeon in the Gastrointestinal Surgery Clinic who specializes in minimally invasive surgery of the upper gastrointestinal tract to treat conditions of the bile ducts, esophagus, gallbladder, intestines and stomach. Lin is certified by the American Board of Surgery and is a member of the Surgical Hospitalist Program at UCSF Medical Center.

Lin earned a medical degree at the UCLA School of Medicine, followed by a general surgery residency at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. He also completed a fellowship at UCSF in minimally invasive and bariatric surgery, funded by the Foundation for Surgical Fellowships. In June, 2012, Lin presented the results of a study to the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, which indicated that sleeve gastrectomy may be performed safely in carefully selected morbidly obese patients with impending organ failure and that their significant weight loss may make them more suitable candidates for organ transplantation. The study was conducted by UCSF bariatric and transplant surgeons. It was the largest such study of its kind to date. Lin has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and is a member of the American Medical Association, American College of Surgeons, Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons and American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. He is an assistant professor of surgery at UCSF.

Clinics

Gastrointestinal Surgery at Parnassus
400 Parnassus Ave., Sixth Floor
San Francisco, CA 94143-0388
Phone: (415) 353-2161
Fax: (415) 353-2505

Hours: Monday to Friday
8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Board Certification

Surgery, American Board of Surgery

Academic Title

Assistant Professor

More about Matthew Lin

Education

University of California Los Angeles School of Medicine 2005

Residencies

Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, General Surgery 2011

Fellowships

UCSF Medical Center, Minimally Invasive and Bariatric Surgery 2012

Selected Research and Publications

  1. Kumar SB, Hamilton BC, Wood SG, Rogers SJ, Carter JT, Lin MY. Is laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy safer than laparoscopic gastric bypass? a comparison of 30-day complications using the MBSAQIP data registry. Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2018 Mar; 14(3):264-269.
  2. Luu HY, Bhangoo MS, Lin MYC. A Rare Cause of Small-Bowel Ischemia. JAMA Surg. 2018 Jan 01; 153(1):81-82.
  3. Vaughn CJ, Kim E, O'Sullivan P, Huang E, Lin MY, Wyles S, Palmer BJ, Pierce JL, Chern H. Peer video review and feedback improve performance in basic surgical skills. Am J Surg. 2016 Feb; 211(2):355-60.
  4. Kaplan JA, Schecter SC, Rogers SJ, Lin MYC, Posselt AM, Carter JT. Expanded indications for bariatric surgery: should patients on chronic steroids be offered bariatric procedures? Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2017 Jan; 13(1):35-40.
  5. Kaplan JA, Schecter S, Lin MY, Rogers SJ, Carter JT. Morbidity and Mortality Associated With Elective or Emergency Paraesophageal Hernia Repair. JAMA Surg. 2015 Nov; 150(11):1094-6.
  6. Carter JT, Kaplan JA, Nguyen JN, Lin MY, Rogers SJ, Harris HW. A prospective, randomized controlled trial of single-incision laparoscopic vs conventional 3-port laparoscopic appendectomy for treatment of acute appendicitis. J Am Coll Surg. 2014 May; 218(5):950-9.
  7. Lin MY, Tavakol MM, Sarin A, Amirkiai SM, Rogers SJ, Carter JT, Posselt AM. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is safe and efficacious for pretransplant candidates. Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2013 Sep-Oct; 9(5):653-8.
  8. Lin MY, Tavakol MM, Sarin A, Amirkiai SM, Rogers SJ, Carter JT, Posselt AM. Safety and feasibility of sleeve gastrectomy in morbidly obese patients following liver transplantation. Surg Endosc. 2013 Jan; 27(1):81-5.

Publications are derived from MEDLINE/PubMed and provided by UCSF Profiles, a service of the Clinical & Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at UCSF. Researchers can make corrections and additions to their publications by logging on to UCSF Profiles.