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Daniel Raper

MBBS

Neurosurgeon
Seeker of new ways to repair the brain's blood vessels

Dr. Daniel Raper is a neurosurgeon who specializes in procedures to repair the blood vessels of the brain and spinal cord. He often cares for patients who are at risk for brain bleed and other types of stroke, including those who have no symptoms. His training allows him to perform traditional ("open") surgeries as well as minimally invasive procedures.

Raper's expertise encompasses care for many conditions involving the brain's blood vessels, including aneurysms (bulging vessels that can rupture), arteriovenous malformations and fistulas (abnormally connected or tangled blood vessels), carotid artery disease (narrowing of the vessels bringing oxygen-rich blood to the brain), intracranial vascular disease (clogged blood vessels in the skull or skull base), and ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes (those caused, respectively, by a blocked artery that supplies the brain and by a ruptured artery bleeding into the brain).

Raper's research focuses on developing safer ways to operate on the brain's blood vessels by combining minimally invasive techniques with traditional approaches. He also participates in clinical trials to evaluate new surgical technologies. He incorporates applications of virtual reality and artificial intelligence into both his teaching and research.

Raper earned his medical degree from the University of Sydney School of Medicine. He completed a residency in neurosurgery and a fellowship in neuroendovascular surgery at the University of Virginia. He completed a fellowship in cerebrovascular surgery at UCSF.

  • Education

    University of Sydney, MBBS, 2011

  • Residencies

    University of Virginia, Neurosurgery, 2019

  • Fellowships

    University of Virginia, Neuroendovascular Surgery, 2019

    UCSF, Cerebrovascular Surgery, 2020

  • Academic Title

    Assistant Professor

I'm dedicated to developing safer and less invasive treatments for complex conditions of the brain's blood vessels.

Where I see patients (2)

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