Treatment Pulmonology

Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis
Treatments

Treating hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) involves both identifying and removing the antigen that's causing the condition, and taking anti-inflammatory medication.

Removing the Antigen

If the inhaled antigen can be recognized and removed, the lung inflammation in acute HP is often reversible. If you have chronic HP, however, the inflammation may persist even when the antigen is removed. If the antigen can't be identified, you may need to change your work or home environment, if possible.

Medication Therapy

If you don't improve or continue to worsen, we may recommend anti-inflammatory medications. Prednisone is the mainstay of medication therapy and is often very effective. If you require long-term medication or don't tolerate prednisone, you may need to take an alternative medication, such as mycophenolate or cyclophosphamide.

Pulmonary Rehabilitation

In addition to medications and removal of the antigen, pulmonary rehabilitation — a structured exercise and educational program designed for patients with chronic lung disease — is an important and effective treatment for patients with chronic HP.

We will also need to pay careful attention to common medical problems associated with HP, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and pulmonary hypertension. Lastly, lung transplant may be an effective treatment option for some patients.

UCSF Health medical specialists have reviewed this information. It is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor or other health care provider. We encourage you to discuss any questions or concerns you may have with your provider.

Recommended reading

FAQ: Cyclophosphamide

Cyclophosphamide is part of a class of drugs called immunosuppressants that suppress the immune response and reduces inflammation in the lungs. Learn more.

FAQ: Methotrexate

Commonly asked questions regarding Methotrexate including, recommendation, precautions, possible side effects, suggested monitoring and more.

FAQ: Mycophenolate

Commonly asked questions regarding Mycophenolate including recommendation, precautions, possible side effects, suggested monitoring and more.

FAQ: Prednisone

Commonly asked questions regarding Prednisone including, the reason for recommendation, special precautions, possible side effects, monitoring, and more.

GERD in ILD Patients

Many studies have shown a link between GERD & lung disease, including interstitial lung disease (ILD). The reason for this relationship is unclear. Learn more.

ILD Nutrition Manual

Nutrition Manual for Interstitial Lung Disease including, General Guidelines for Eating Healthy, Body Mass Index, Increasing Protein in Your Diet and more.

ILD Resources

Patients living with interstitial lung disease (ILD) will find numerous resources listed here, offering information and support.

Pulmonary Hypertension and Interstitial Lung Disease

Pulmonary hypertension, or PH, occurs when blood pressure in the lungs becomes elevated, and can be caused by a thickening of the pulmonary artery walls.

Pulmonary Rehabilitation for ILD Patients

Pulmonary rehabilitation is a comprehensive program for lung disease patients whose symptoms are impacting their everyday activities. Learn more here.

Supplemental Oxygen

Find Supplemental Oxygen Resources including, The Need for Supplemental Oxygen, Your Oxygen Equipment, Oxygen Safety, Traveling With Oxygen, and more.

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