Overview

Sarcoma

Sarcoma is a cancer that begins in a bone or soft tissue in various regions of the body. Soft tissue sarcoma forms in tissues – such as fat, muscle, blood vessels, tendons and nerves – that connect and surround body parts. More than 70 sarcomas have been identified, and treatment options depend on the cancer's type, location and other factors.

Risk factors for sarcoma include exposure to certain chemicals or viruses, radiation therapy for other cancers, and chronic swelling of the lymphatic system, known as lymphedema. Some inherited syndromes, including Li-Fraumeni syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1 and familial retinoblastoma, also increase the risk of sarcoma.

Our approach to sarcoma

We offer cutting-edge care for patients with sarcoma through the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, which is part of an international alliance of leading cancer centers called the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Our team of highly experienced thoracic surgeons and oncologists is recognized both nationally and internationally for the advanced, state-of-the-art treatments we provide for sarcomas in both children and adults. Offering advanced options, such as targeted therapy and immunotherapy, we customize treatments to the individual needs of each patient, looking at the sarcoma's type, stage and location as well as the patient's medical history.

Awards & recognition

  • usnews-neurology

    Best hospital in Northern California

  • Best in Northern California in cancer care

  • NIH-2x

    Designated comprehensive cancer center

UCSF Health medical specialists have reviewed this information. It is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor or other health care provider. We encourage you to discuss any questions or concerns you may have with your provider.

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